Richard Dumont | Manchester Real Estate, Hooksett Real Estate, Goffstown Real Estate


Are you planning on buying a home by a certain date? It’s unfortunate that life can’t go as we plan it all the time! With a bit of planning finding the right home at the right time is possible. Many times, families are looking to buy a home before the end of the summer. This allows them to get settled in and get the kids started in a new school before the start of the year in September. Just because there are more popular times throughout the year to move doesn’t mean that the inventory of homes changes much as to what’s on the market. Whatever the reason for the short supply of homes, you’ll need to be informed and creative in order to land a house in a high demand market when it’s crunch time. Below, you’ll find some tips to help you on your search.


Research Your Location Ahead Of Time 


Every housing market has a bit of a down time. You want to pinpoint that period. Does your location have a time of year where people flee the area for vacations? The holiday season can also be a great time to look. There may still be low supply, but there also will be less competition. Do a bit of research in order to find pricing trends. When the prices dip, you’ll know that’s a time where competition for homes is lower.


Always Have Your Finances In Order


When you’re buying a home, no matter what time of year it is, you need to have your lender on call. Make sure that you have been preapproved and that your downpayment money is at your disposal. Sellers like serious buyers who are ready to pass paperwork.  


Know What You’re Willing To Compromise On


When you’re buying a home on a timeline, you may not have the luxury of searching around endlessly to meet your wishlist. You should have a few musts, but there may be many things that you’ll need to work with or compromise on in finding the right property. You may be able to find a home in the right neighborhood, but it might not have the granite countertops that you’re looking for. When time is of the essence, your home search priorities need to be set straight.  


Don’t Look For Bargains


When you’re in a time crunch to land a home, you don’t want to fool around with price. In order to land a home that you love, you might have to offer a bit more than the asking price. There’s no space for a bidding war, a low offer, or an extended search when you need to buy a home fast.          

  


If you receive a "lowball" offer to purchase your house, your first reaction may be to respond with an immediate "No." However, it is important to evaluate any offer to purchase your house closely. Because if you weigh the pros and cons of rejecting an offer to purchase your home, you'll be better equipped than ever before to make an informed decision about any homebuying proposal you receive.

Now, let's take a look at three factors to consider before you reject an offer to purchase your residence.

1. Your Home's Price

What you may consider to be a lowball offer to purchase your home may actually be a competitive homebuying proposal – it all depends on the current state of the housing market. Thus, if you analyze the housing market, you can find out how your home's price stacks up against the prices of comparable houses and review an offer to purchase accordingly.

If you find your home's price falls in line with similar houses in your city or town, you likely have a competitive initial asking price in place. And if a buyer's offer to purchase your home falls short of your house's initial asking price, you may want to decline the proposal.

On the other hand, if your home is priced much higher than comparable residences in your area, you may want to adjust your home selling expectations. In this instance, you may find a lowball offer to purchase turns out to be a competitive homebuying proposal. As a result, you may be more inclined to accept the proposal based on the current housing market's conditions.

2. Your Home's Condition

Oftentimes, buyers will account for potential home repairs or upgrades they will need to complete if they acquire a house. This means a buyer may submit an offer to purchase below a seller's initial asking price due to the fact that a house may require assorted repairs or upgrades in the near future.

Take a look at the condition of your home – you'll be glad you did. If you find your home is in need of significant repairs or upgrades, you may want to consider these projects before you reject a buyer's offer to purchase your house.

3. Your Home Selling Goals

It generally is a good idea to start the home selling journey with goals in hand. That way, if an offer to purchase your house allows you to achieve your home selling goals, you can accept the proposal. Or, if an offer to purchase your house moves you further away from accomplishing your home selling goals, you can reject the proposal.

As you get set to complete the home selling journey, you may want to hire a real estate agent too. This housing market professional can help you assess any offers to purchase your house, at any time. By doing so, a real estate agent can help you determine how to proceed with an offer to purchase and ensure you can make the best-possible decision.


Life is complicated; however, your moving day experience does not have to be this way. In fact, there are many ways to avoid a complicated moving day experience, and these include:

1. Plan Ahead As Much As Possible

When it comes to moving day, it pays to be prepared. Thus, if you plan ahead as much as possible, you can identify any potential moving day pitfalls and address them before they escalate.

Pack as many items as you can before moving day – you'll be glad you did. If you pack in the weeks and days leading up to your move, you can avoid the stress of last-minute packing.

Also, box and label all of your personal belongings. This will make it simple to safely pack all of your personal belongings into a moving truck and find these items as soon as you reach your final destination.

2. Get Plenty of Rest Before Moving Day Arrives

Moving day likely will be a long, arduous experience, regardless of how much you plan for it. Conversely, if you get a good night's rest before moving day, you can kick off your move feeling rejuvenated and refreshed.

In addition, you should start your moving day with a healthy breakfast. This will give you something to look forward to on moving day, and the breakfast itself will provide you with plenty of energy to help you seize the day.

Don't forget to plan regular breaks as you complete your move. If you do not take a break every once and a while, you risk wearing down quickly on moving day.

3. Hire a Moving Company

There is no need to leave anything to chance, especially if you're planning a big move. Luckily, moving companies are available in cities and towns nationwide, and these businesses employ highly trained moving professionals to assist you in any way possible.

If you intend to hire a moving company, don't wait. Remember, the longer that you wait to employ a moving company, the less likely it becomes that this business will be available when the big day arrives.

Furthermore, you should check out a variety of moving companies in your area. This will enable you to examine various moving companies' strengths and weaknesses and determine which business can fulfill your moving needs.

If you need extra help determining whether a moving company is right for you, it never hurts to reach out to the business directly. In most instances, a moving company can provide client referrals that can help you make an informed decision.

Lastly, for those who are uncertain about how to prepare for a move, it may be helpful to collaborate with a real estate agent. This housing market professional can help you buy or sell a house, along with provide insights into what it takes to complete a successful relocation.

Want to enjoy an uncomplicated moving day experience? Use the aforementioned tips, and you can reap the benefits of a seamless transition from one address to another.



Give new life to outdoor tabletops using concrete or tile - and liven up one of the most important parts of your home, your porch or patio. It is surprisingly easy to make over an existing table; in some cases, the base of a table remains in excellent shape, while the horizontal surface ages more swiftly. A tile or concrete finish allows you to use what you already have and to make a custom piece you'll enjoy for years to come. While every project is different, the details below will help you get started with a concrete or tile makeover. 

Tile vs. Concrete - What's the Difference? 

Tile and concrete will have the same basic costs and take the same amount of time to complete. The differences lie in the look of the final results; you may prefer the look of a single, impressive slab or an artistic, tile mosaic, or another version that may better fit your home. The final consideration is tools and experience. If you've already laid tile in a bathroom or kitchen, or have a tile saw and tools, then tile may be the right fit for your makeover. If you've made concrete stepping stones and other pieces for the yard, then you might be more comfortable with this material instead. 

Refinishing a Tabletop with Tile

Make sure your tabletop is in decent shape and that there are not any large gaps or large areas of damage. Measure your tabletop and sketch out a design.  You can create an artistic rendering, a geometric pattern or simply place the tile in a line. Planning things out first ensures you know how much to buy and what to cut. For tables, the pre-cut pieces designed for borders and trim often work well, so a trip to the DIY store can help you determine more about your needs and preferences. 

Choose Your Tile & Gather Supplies

You'll need a tile adhesive rated for outdoor use to secure the tiles. Layout the tiles on the table before securing to check the fit and look of your chosen design. When you are happy, glue the pieces into place with the adhesive. Work in small areas and allow the glue to set for at least 24 hours (cover the table with plastic if needed). 

Fill in the gaps between tiles with mortar rated for outdoor use, and allow to dry at least 48 hours before using the table. 

Refinishing a Tabletop with Concrete

Concrete's smooth surface comes from being poured, so you'll need to prepare the table before you mix anything. Your table should be clean, dry and clear of any defects, though the concrete will fill in small holes and hide minor blemishes. 

Create an edge around the table using a product made for concrete. This temporary barrier will be removed at a later date, but will keep the concrete in place as it dries. You can find flexible edging designed for this purpose at a DIY store. 

Mix the concrete as indicated on the package, then pour or scoop onto the table, smoothing it out with a trowel as you go. Once the concrete begins to set, you can make any impressions or patterns you like, or simply let it dry and harden. Do not remove the edges until the concrete is fully dried. 

48 hours later, remove the edging and sand or touch up the table, then enjoy.

Concrete or tile? The choice is yours -- either of these finishes will add years to the life of your table and ensure you create a piece that is uniquely yours. Allow yourself a weekend to tackle this project and wait for a sunny, comfortable day, as most parts need to be completed in place outdoors. 

 


Photo by DraganCFM via Shutterstock

It’s always a quandary: can I buy my new home and sell my old house so that the timing of both matches? Well, yes! There are several ways to do this. Here’s a breakdown of how it can work.

Buy a Home on a Contingency.

Just what is a contingency? It’s an agreement you make with the seller that your purchase of their home is “contingent” on — or based on the successful completion of — the sale of your current home. That way, if your house doesn’t sell, you aren’t required to buy the new one.

The distinct advantage is that you get what you want, a well-timed move. But if your house doesn't sell within the given time frame, you could lose out and the house you’re looking to buy goes back on the market.

The clear disadvantage is that it's a less than stellar offer to the seller. Given two proposals to consider, the seller's urgency — not your need, determines if they accept your offer or not. Look at it from their vantage point. They know nothing about the house you're attempting to sell.

Extend the Closing — On Your Offer.

A second option is to make the offer without a contingency but ask for a longer-than-normal time to close. That allows you to sell your current house during the closing period. You'll need to rely on your agent to properly market your home and price it to sell within the time allotted. This type of option works if you don't need the funds from the sale to make the purchase or to qualify for the loan.

Extend the Closing — On Your Sale.

Another way to do this is to extend the closing on the home you’re selling. To do this, you sell your home first with an extended closing; then you find a home to buy, make an offer, and time that closing to match.

In this case, you may risk not being able to close on the new home on time, but the overlap might be small enough that you could bunk with a family member or friend.

Each of these scenarios requires careful timing with your real estate agent, mortgage brokers and the market. Before embarking on any of these plans, thoroughly discuss how it needs to work with your agent but build in some leeway in case you have a few days of uncertainty.




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