Richard Dumont | Manchester Real Estate, Hooksett Real Estate, Goffstown Real Estate


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Identity theft is an issue that has become more common since the digital age has bristled and bloomed. Many people are victims of phishing scams – an online predator steals your identity by impersonating a respectable institution and takes your sensitive information, financial information being stolen from non-secured sites, hacking or good, old-fashioned credit card theft, to name a few. Every form of identity theft can lead to severely damaging credit reports and scores, and may affect whether or not you’re able to purchase your next home.

Are you a victim of identity theft?

Often, your financial institution will contact you if they suspect suspicious activity on your accounts. As an account holder, monitoring these accounts or setting up an extra layer of security notifications will also help you figure out when someone is trying to steal your identity. Some of the tell-tale signs of identity theft can include a rapidly plummeting credit score, random accounts appearing in your financial hub, notification of attempted loan applications via mail, etc.

What should you do if you think you’ve been targeted for identity theft?

Freeze Your Credit

You can put a freeze on your credit by contacting the three major credit bureaus. When doing so, feel free to report that you suspect you’ve been targeted for identity theft. Once you place the freeze on your account, creditors will have to verify that they have done their due diligence in confirming your identity should they wish to open a new account for you or check your credit report.

Send a Fraud Alert

You may also want to send a fraud alert out to the credit bureaus. Doing so informs them that there’s been a breach in your personal security, and you’re trying to amend the situation.

Check Your Credit Report

Monitor your credit report to see where things went awry. You are entitled to one free credit report per year, so make the most of it. Obtaining your credit report should allow you to pinpoint exactly when the fraudulent activity started and give you some insight into what was going on at the time.

Talk to the Debt Collectors

If someone has taken advantage of your credit and your identity, there’s a good chance you’ll be receiving some information from debt collectors; especially if you were unaware that the debt was being racked up in the first place. The best thing to do is give them a call and find out exactly which debt they’re collecting on, who they’re acting on behalf of and get any other information that may pertain to your identity being stolen.

File a Report

Identity theft is a heavy crime and should be reported to the police immediately. After reporting with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and getting your report, be sure to have an official government ID with photograph, all current mailing information and any other reports that you’ve collected stating that your identity has been stolen.
Many Americans are afflicted by identity theft every year. Once the issue has been halted and is monitored carefully, you may want to start rebuilding. Request a new card from your credit card company and bank. Keep an eye on those accounts, protect yourself by taking the extra security measures of shopping on secured sites, requesting verification from anyone asking you for sensitive information and checking your credit activity often. This will lower your chances of undergoing a second attack.



Selling a home may prove to be difficult, particularly for individuals who strive to maximize their day-to-day productivity. In many instances, the time and costs associated with listing a home, promoting it to potential buyers and performing other home selling tasks can add up quickly. But if you know how to act as a productive home seller, you should have no trouble maximizing the time and resources at your disposal.

What does it take to become a productive home seller? Here are three tips to help you maximize your productivity throughout the home selling process.

1. Remove Clutter

Clutter will only slow you down during the home selling cycle. As such, you'll want to do everything you can to minimize clutter prior to listing your residence.

Artwork, photographs and other personal mementos in your home should be placed in storage until you sell your residence. That way, you can free up space in your house, as well as make it easy for homebuyers to envision what life might be like if they acquire your residence.

Also, if you have items that you no longer need, don't hesitate to sell or donate these items. And if you own items that are broken or damaged, you should dispose of these items altogether.

2. Understand the Home Selling Process

When it comes to the home selling process, it pays to be diligent. If you understand what to expect before you list your house, you'll be better prepared than ever before to handle any home selling challenges that might come your way.

Furthermore, think about the buyer's perspective during the home selling cycle – you'll be glad you did. A homebuyer wants to find a home that delivers exceptional value. As a home seller, you'll want to do whatever you can to show a buyer that your house is the ideal choice.

For home sellers, it pays to consider what you'll need to do to promote your house to the right groups of potential buyers. If you plan ahead and learn about the home selling process, you can make informed choices that may help you get the best price for your residence.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent is committed to client satisfaction, and as a result, will go above and beyond the call of duty to help you maximize your productivity. This housing market professional will offer expert recommendations throughout the home selling journey to make it simple to achieve your desired results. Plus, he or she will set up home showings, keep you up to date about offers on your house and much more.

It helps to hire a real estate agent who understands the ins and outs of the housing market in your area. With this real estate agent at your side, you can quickly and effortlessly navigate the home selling cycle.

Stay productive as you sell your house – use the aforementioned tips, and you can increase the likelihood of a quick, seamless home selling experience.


You may keep a spare house key hidden somewhere around your home just in case you lose or forget your main set of keys. How does your hiding place measure up? Is it too obvious that anyone including thieves can find it? You can still have a spare key easily accessible to you without sacrificing the security of your home. 


Never sacrifice the safety of your home for convenience. If you fail to have an alarm system set as an added layer of security, you really could be in trouble if your spare key isn’t well hidden. Burglars now have free and easy access to your home.  


The Most Obvious Places To Hide A Key


Under The Mat


Everyone (especially burglars) will look under the mat for a key to get into your home. If you see it in the movies, it’s probably too obvious of a hiding place. 


The Flower Pot


This is a textbook area to hide a key in that can be easily accessed by intruders. Criminals know where to look, so you need to think ahead of them. 


Fake Rocks


If the rock doesn’t blend in, it’s not a good hiding spot! Many pre-fabricated hiding systems can be a bit obvious, so beware. 


On Your Person


Whether you put a spare key in a wallet or your purse, if that gets stolen, there goes your spare key. The perpetrator also has access to your home. It’s generally not a good practice to keep a spare key on your person. 


Good Places For A Spare Key


With A Trusted Neighbor


If the neighbor hides your key on their property, if a thief does find the key, they will assume the key goes to the neighbor’s house. This is a safe, convenient way to keep a spare key as long as the key is kept somewhere outside the home. You don’t want to face a lockout only to find out that your neighbor isn’t home.  


In Your Car


Surprisingly, most break-ins happen during the daytime when you’re not home. If you keep your spare key in your car, the key won’t be there while you aren’t home.


Near The Dog


If a key is hidden near the place where the dog will be, you’ll have little to worry about. Burglars really don’t like dogs, mostly because dogs don’t like them!  



Forget About Keys


Technology affords us one great option in the present day- keyless entry. If you are constantly forgetting your keys you should invest in a keyless lock system. These typically have codes that can be programmed. Just don’t forget the code! 



99 Dartmouth Street, Manchester, NH 03102

Multi-Family

$284,900
Price

3
Total Units
Owner occupied multi family and features First floor with 5 rms., 2 BRs and pantry. 2nd floor has a 3 room unit and 6 rm. owners unit which includes the finished 3rd floor. All separate utilities. Improvements over the years includes Architectural Roof, painted exterior, thermopane windows, new 100 Amp Circuit Breakers. There are some finishing touches needed but a very manageable property. Current COC in place. Lots of parking and large private yard with stockade fence.
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses




This Single-Family in Goffstown, NH recently sold for $290,000. This Ranch style home was sold by Richard Dumont - CENTURY 21 Dumont and Associates.


421 Paige Hill Road, Goffstown, NH 03045-3035

Single-Family

$299,900
Price
$290,000
Sale Price

2
Bedrooms
6
Rooms
2
Baths
Country hide-away on 6.83 Acres. Large ranch w/5 rooms and 3-season enclosed porch. 2 Bedrooms, Fireplaced Living room, beautiful wide pine floors, 30' Family room with pergo floors and ceiling fan. Kitchen w/ skylight, granite counters, electric range, new refrigerator, dishwasher and wood cabinets. Dining Area with ceiling fan. Bedrooms with wide pine floors and 6 panel doors throughout. Front decking with roof. Exterior shed in rear. 2-car carport with storage. Enjoy the view of the nearby pond. Long driveway.






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